IRS Tax News

  • 16 Mar 2021 3:03 PM | Anonymous

    WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today reminded taxpayers about the rules for required minimum distributions (RMDs) from retirement accounts.

    A retirement plan account owner must normally begin taking an RMD annually starting the year he or she reaches 70 ½ or 72, depending on their birthdate and maybe the year they retire. Retirement plans requiring RMDs include traditional, Simplified Employee Pension Plan (SEP) and Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees (SIMPLE) Individual Retirement Accounts; 401(k), 403(b), 457(b), profit sharing and other defined contribution plans.

    The Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act changed the age when individuals must begin taking withdrawals from their retirement accounts. Someone born on or before June 30, 1949, was required to start getting RMDs for the year they reached the age of 70½. However, under the SECURE Act, if a person’s 70th birthday is July 1, 2019, or later, they do not have to take their first RMD until the year they reach age 72.

    The Coronavirus, Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act waived RMDs during 2020 so seniors and retirees, including beneficiaries with inherited accounts, were not required to take money out of IRAs and workplace retirement plans. The waiver included RMDs for individuals who turned age 70½ in 2019 and took their first RMD in 2020.

    Individuals who reached age 70 ½ before 2020 and were still employed, but terminated employment in 2020, would normally have a 2020 RMD due by April 1, 2021, from their workplace retirement plan. This RMD is also waived as part of the CARES Act relief. Roth IRAs do not require withdrawals until after the death of the owner. 

    2021 RMDs

    Individuals who reached 70 ½ in 2019 or earlier, did not have an RMD due for 2020. For 2021, they will have an RMD due by Dec. 31, 2021. Individuals who did not reach age 70 ½ in 2019 will reach age 72 in 2021 will have their first RMD due by April 1, 2022, and their second RMD due by Dec. 31, 2022. To avoid having both amounts included in their income for the same year, the taxpayer can make the first withdrawal by Dec. 31, 2021, instead of waiting until April 1, 2022. After the first year, all RMDs must be made by Dec. 31.

    An IRA trustee must either report the amount of the RMD to the IRA owner or offer to calculate it for the owner. Calculating the amount of the RMD depends on the type of IRA or if they are from multiple accounts. Not taking a required distribution, or not withdrawing enough, could mean a 50% excise tax on the amount not distributed.

    Some can delay RMDs

    Though the April 1 deadline for taking the first RMD is mandatory for all owners of traditional IRAs, participants in workplace retirement plans who are still working usually can, if their plan allows, wait until April 1 of the year after they retire to start receiving distributions from these plans. Individuals who reached age 70 ½ before 2020 and were still employed, but terminated employment in 2020, would normally have a 2020 RMD due by April 1, 2021 from their workplace retirement plan. This RMD is also waived as part of the CARES Act relief.

    Employees of public schools and certain tax-exempt organizations should check with their employer, plan administrator or provider to see how to treat these accruals.

    Coronavirus-related distributions and loans

    The CARES Act made it easier to access savings in IRAs and workplace retirement plans for those affected by the coronavirus. This relief provided favorable tax treatment for certain withdrawals from retirement plans and IRAs, including expanded loan options.

    Distributions: Certain distributions made from Jan. 1, 2020, through Dec. 30, 2020, from IRAs or workplace retirement plans to qualified individuals may be treated as coronavirus-related distributions. These distributions are not subject to the 10% additional tax on early distributions (including the 25% additional tax on certain SIMPLE IRA distributions).

    Taxes on coronavirus-related distributions are includible in taxable income:

    • Over a three-year period, one-third each year, or
    • If elected, in the year you take the distribution.

    Coronavirus-related distributions may be repaid to an IRA or workplace retirement plan within three years.

    If you had an outstanding loan balance in when you left employment, the plan sponsor will usually offset the loan balance against your benefit.

    • For loan offsets in 2020, you have until the due date of your tax return (plus extensions) to repay that amount to another retirement plan or IRA.
    • If you’re a qualified individual, you can treat the loan offset as a coronavirus-related distribution and have three years to repay to an IRA or include in income tax ratably over three years.

    RMDs: An IRA owner or beneficiary who received an RMD in 2020 had the option of returning it to their account or other qualified plan to avoid paying taxes on that distribution. RMDs in 2020 that were not rolled over or repaid may be eligible to be treated as coronavirus-related distributions if the individual is a qualified individual. A 2020 RMD that otherwise qualifies as a coronavirus-related distribution may be repaid over a 3-year period or have the taxes due on the distribution spread over three years.

    A withdrawal from an inherited IRA to a qualified individual may also be a coronavirus-related distribution. Income from the withdrawal may be spread over three years for income inclusion; however, the withdrawal may not be repaid to the inherited IRA.

    IRS Notice 2020-51 provided that the one rollover per 12-month period limitation and the restriction on rollovers to inherited IRAs did not apply to repayments made by Aug. 31, 2020. The RMD suspension did not apply to qualified defined benefit plans.

    The CARES Act included special rules for plan loans made to qualified individuals. Plans could suspend loan repayments for up to one year, although, typically, repayments resumed in January 2021. This effectively gives up to six years (instead of five) to repay a typical plan loan.

    IRS online tools and publications can help

    Taxpayers can find answers, forms and instructions and easy-to-use tools at IRS.gov.

    This news release is part of a series called the Tax Time Guide, a resource to help taxpayers file an accurate tax return. Additional help is available in Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax.


  • 16 Mar 2021 11:12 AM | Anonymous

    Notice 2021-17 clarifies section IV.E of Notice 2021–12 https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/n-21-12.pdf, 2021–6 I.R.B. 828, by providing a more precise citation in the scope of that provision. 

    Notice 2021-17 will be in IRB:  2021-14, dated  April 5, 2021


  • 16 Mar 2021 10:15 AM | Anonymous

    WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today said that it continues its efforts to expand ways to communicate to taxpayers who prefer to get information in other languages. For the first time ever, the agency has posted to IRS.gov a Spanish language version of Form 1040 and the related instructions.

    “Being able to talk to and receive information from the nation’s tax agency in their preferred language is something we hope to eventually provide to all taxpayers,” said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. “We want everyone to be on the same playing field, so to speak, and each day that we can move forward with that goal is a good one.”

    The new Form 1040 Schedule LEP, in English and Spanish, with instructions available in English and 20 other languages, can be filed with a tax return by those taxpayers who prefer to communicate with the IRS in another language. They can indicate their language of preference for IRS-issued written communications or change their language of preference. While communications may not be immediately sent in the selected language, the IRS will use this information to allocate resources and develop communication alternatives based on the reported language preferences.

    “When it comes to filing taxes, being able to ask questions and read forms and instructions is crucial,” said Ken Corbin, IRS Taxpayer Experience Officer. “We take that very seriously and continue to work toward ensuring all taxpayers have what they need without obstacles.”

    IRS Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax, has been streamlined for tax year 2020, and is now available in Spanish, Chinese (Simplified); Chinese (Traditional); Vietnamese; Korean; and Russian.

    Many pages of IRS.gov are now available in seven other languages: Spanish, Vietnamese, Russian, Korean, Haitian Creole and Chinese − Simplified and Traditional. Here are some additional materials and services that are now available in multiple languages:

    • Publication 1, Your Rights as a Taxpayer, and other basic tax information are now available in 20 languages on IRS.gov.
    • Taxpayers who interact with an IRS representative have access to over the phone interpreter services in more than 350 languages.
    • The Earned Income Tax Assistant tool is newly available in Spanish.
    • • The agency continues to incorporate multilingual information into its social media platforms, including Twitter and Instagram. IRS highlights key messages in six languages, including Spanish, Vietnamese, Russian, Korean, Haitian Creole and Chinese, using both Twitter Moments and Instagram Highlights.
    • • Introduced for tax year 2019, the Form 1040-SR, in English and Spanish, features larger print and a standard deduction chart making it easier to use for older Americans.
    • • Form W-4 enables taxpayers to correctly adjust their withholding during 2021. The English language version as well as the Spanish language version are available.

    The agency is also inserting information about translation services and other multilingual options into the top notices sent to taxpayers. For more information, see the “We Speak Your Language” page on IRS.gov.


  • 15 Mar 2021 1:36 PM | Anonymous

    Revenue Ruling 2021-07 provides various prescribed rates for federal income tax purposes including the applicable federal interest rates, the adjusted applicable federal interest rates, the adjusted federal long-term rate, and the adjusted federal long-term tax-exempt rate. These rates are determined as prescribed by § 1274. 

    The rates are published monthly for purposes of sections 42, 382, 412, 642, 1288, 1274, 7520, 7872, and various other sections of the Internal Revenue Code.


  • 15 Mar 2021 1:35 PM | Anonymous

    WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today announced it will accept applications for an 18-month Low Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC) matching grant from all qualified organizations.

    The application period will run from March 15, 2021-April 16, 2021. The budget and the period of performance for the supplemental grant will be July 1, 2021-Dec. 31, 2022.  Organizations currently receiving a grant for 2021 are not eligible to apply.

    Qualified organizations that are awarded grants will ensure the fairness and integrity of the tax system for taxpayers who are low-income or speak English as a second language (ESL taxpayers) by: providing pro bono representation on their behalf in tax disputes with the IRS, educating them about their rights and responsibilities as taxpayers, and identifying and advocating for issues that impact these taxpayers.

    Applications will be accepted from all areas, but priority consideration will be given to organizations that can provide services in the identified geographic areas, listed below.

    Geographic underserved areas in need of LITC services:

    • Arizona - Gila County
    • Florida - Brevard, Citrus, Flagler, Hernando, Lake, Orange, Putnam, Seminole and Sumter Counties
    • Idaho - Ada, Adams, Bannock, Bear Lake, Bingham, Boise, Bonneville, Butte, Canyon, Caribou, Clark, Clearwater, Custer, Franklin, Freemont, Gem, Idaho, Jefferson, Latah, Lemhi, Lewis, Madison, Nez Perce, Oneida, Owyhee, Payette, Power, Teton, Washington and Valley Counties
    • Nevada - Entire state
    • North Dakota - Entire state
    • Pennsylvania - Bradford, Clinton, Lycoming, Monroe, Northumberland, Pike, Snyder, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga and Wyoming Counties
    • Puerto Rico - Entire territory
    • West Virginia - Entire state
    • Wyoming - Entire state

    The LITC Program is a federal grant program administered by the Office of the Taxpayer Advocate at the IRS, led by National Taxpayer Advocate Erin M. Collins. The LITC Program awards matching grants of up to $100,000 per year to qualifying organizations to develop, expand or continue low income taxpayer clinics.

    The LITC Program funds organizations to represent low-income taxpayers who have a tax controversy with the IRS and to educate ESL taxpayers about their rights and responsibilities as U.S. taxpayers. An LITC must provide services for free or for no more than a nominal fee.

    Although LITCs receive partial funding from the IRS, LITCs, their employees and their volunteers operate independently from the IRS. Examples of qualifying organizations include but are not limited to:

    • Clinical programs at accredited law, business or accounting schools whose students represent low-income taxpayers in tax disputes with the IRS.
    • Organizations exempt from income tax under Internal Revenue Code Section 501(a) whose employees and volunteers represent low income taxpayers in tax disputes with the IRS or refer those taxpayers to qualified representatives.

    Applications must be submitted electronically at www.grants.gov by 11:59 p.m. (Eastern Time) on April 16, 2021. The funding number is TREAS-GRANTS-052021-002.

    Copies of IRS Publication 3319, 2021 Grant Application Package and Guidelines, can be downloaded from IRS.gov, ordered online from IRS.gov or ordered by phone by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

    Questions about the LITC Program or grant application process can be addressed to the LITC Program Office at 202-317-4700 (not a toll-free call) or by email at LITCProgramOffice@irs.gov. In addition, individuals may also contact Bill Beard at (949) 575-6200 (not a toll-free number) or by e-mail at beard.william@irs.gov.

    More information about LITCs and the work they do to represent, educate and advocate on behalf of low-income and ESL taxpayers is available in IRS Publication 5066, LITC Program Report. A short video about the LITC program is available on the IRS website.

    Anyone can join the LITC staff for a Zoom webinar where they will provide information about the LITC program and the application process. For details on the date and time of the webinar, please check the LITC page on IRS.gov.


  • 15 Mar 2021 8:54 AM | Anonymous

    WASHINGTON – The Internal Revenue Service announced today that the third round of Economic Impact Payments will begin reaching Americans over the next week.

    Following approval of the American Rescue Plan Act, the first batch of payments will be sent by direct deposit, which some recipients will start receiving as early as this weekend, and with more receiving this coming week.

    Additional batches of payments will be sent in the coming weeks by direct deposit and through the mail as a check or debit card. The vast majority of these payments will be by direct deposit.

    No action is needed by most taxpayers; the payments will be automatic and, in many cases, similar to how people received the first and second round of Economic Impact Payments in 2020. People can check the “Get My Payment” tool on IRS.gov on Monday to see the payment status of the third stimulus payment.

    “Even though the tax season is in full swing, IRS employees again worked around the clock to quickly deliver help to millions of Americans struggling to cope with this historic pandemic,” said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. “The payments will be delivered automatically to taxpayers even as the IRS continues delivering regular tax refunds. We urge people to visit IRS.gov for the latest details on the stimulus payments, other new tax law provisions and tax season updates.”

    Highlights of the third round of Economic Impact Payments; IRS will automatically calculate amounts

    In general, most people will get $1,400 for themselves and $1,400 for each of their qualifying dependents claimed on their tax return. As with the first two Economic Impact Payments in 2020, most Americans will receive their money without having to take any action. Some Americans may see the direct deposit payments as pending or as provisional payments in their accounts before the official payment date of March 17.

    Because these payments are automatic for most eligible people, contacting either financial institutions or the IRS on payment timing will not speed up their arrival. Social Security and other federal beneficiaries will generally receive this third payment the same way as their regular benefits. A payment date for this group will be announced shortly.

    The third round of Economic Impact Payments (EIP3) will be based on the taxpayer’s latest processed tax return from either 2020 or 2019. This includes anyone who successfully registered online at IRS.gov using the agency’s Non-Filers tool last year, or alternatively, submitted a special simplified tax return to the IRS. If the IRS has received and processed a taxpayer’s 2020 return, the agency will instead make the calculation based on that return.

    In addition, the IRS will automatically send EIP3 to people who didn’t file a return but receive Social Security retirement, survivor or disability benefits (SSDI), Railroad Retirement benefits, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Veterans Affairs benefits. This is similar to the first and second rounds of Economic Impact Payments, often referred to as EIP1 and EIP2.

    For those who received EIP1 or EIP2 but don’t receive a payment via direct deposit, they will generally receive a check or, in some instances, a prepaid debit card (referred to as an “EIP Card). A payment will not be added to an existing EIP card mailed for the first or second round of stimulus payments.

    Under the new law, an EIP3 cannot be offset to pay various past-due federal debts or back taxes. 

    The IRS reminds taxpayers that the income levels in this new round of stimulus payments have changed. This means that some people won't be eligible for the third payment even if they received a first or second Economic Impact Payment or claimed a 2020 Recovery Rebate Credit. Payments will begin to be reduced for individuals making $75,000 or above in Adjusted Gross Income ($150,000 for married filing jointly.) The reduced payments end at $80,000 for individuals ($160,000); people above these levels are ineligible for a payment. More information is available on IRS.gov.

    New payments differ from earlier Economic Impact Payments

    The third round of stimulus payments, those authorized by the 2021 American Rescue Plan Act, differs from the earlier payments in several respects:

    • The third stimulus payment will be larger for most people. Most families will get $1,400 per person, including all dependents claimed on their tax return. Typically, this means a single person with no dependents will get $1,400, while a family of four (married couple with two dependents) will get $5,600. 
    • Unlike the first two payments, the third stimulus payment is not restricted to children under 17. Eligible families will get a payment based on all of their qualifying dependents claimed on their return, including older relatives like college students, adults with disabilities, parents and grandparents.

    Additional information is available on IRS.gov.


  • 11 Mar 2021 1:17 PM | Anonymous

    WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service notes that taxpayers of all ages may be able to claim a deduction on their 2020 tax return for contributions to their Individual Retirement Arrangement made through April 15, 2021. There is no longer a maximum age for making IRA contributions.

    An IRA is designed to enable employees and the self-employed to save for retirement. Most taxpayers who work are eligible to start a traditional or Roth IRA or add money to an existing account.

    Contributions to a traditional IRA are usually tax deductible, and distributions are generally taxable. There is still time to make contributions that count for a 2020 tax return, if they are made by April 15, 2021. Taxpayers can file their return claiming a traditional IRA contribution before the contribution is actually made. The contribution must then be made by the April due date of the return. While contributions to a Roth IRA are not tax deductible, qualified distributions are tax-free. In addition, low- and moderate-income taxpayers making these contributions may also qualify for the Saver’s Credit.

    Generally, eligible taxpayers can contribute up to $6,000 to an IRA for 2020. For someone who was 50 years of age or older at the end of 2020, the limit is increased to $7,000. The restrictions on taxpayers age 70 1/2 or older to make contributions to their IRA were removed in 2020.

    Qualified contributions to one or more traditional IRAs are deductible up to the contribution limit or 100% of the taxpayer’s compensation, whichever is less.

    For 2020, if a taxpayer is covered by a workplace retirement plan, the deduction for contributions to a traditional IRA is generally reduced depending on the taxpayer’s modified adjusted gross income:

    Single or head of household filers with income of $65,000 or less can take a full deduction up to the amount of their contribution limit. For incomes more than $65,000 but less than $75,000, there is a partial deduction and if $75,000 or more there is no deduction.

    Filers that are married filing jointly or a qualifying widow(er) with $104,000 or less of income, a full deduction up to the amount of the contribution limit is permitted. Filers with more than $104,000 but less than $124,000 can claim a partial deduction and if their income is at least $124,000, no deduction is available.

    For joint filers, where the spouse making the IRA contribution is not covered by a workplace plan, but their spouse is covered, a full deduction is available if their modified AGI is $196,000 or less. There’s a partial deduction if their income is between $196,000 and $206,000 and no deduction if their income is $206,000 or more.

    Filers who are married filing separately and have an income of less than $10,000 can claim a partial deduction. If their income is at least $10,000, there is no deduction.

    Worksheets are available in the Form 1040 Instructions or in Publication 590-A, Contributions to Individual Retirement Arrangements. The deduction is claimed on Form 1040, Schedule 1. Nondeductible contributions to a traditional IRA are reported on Form 8606.

    Even though contributions to Roth IRAs are not tax deductible, the maximum permitted amount of these contributions begins to phase out for taxpayers whose modified adjusted gross income is above a certain level:

    • For filers who are married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er), that level is $196,000.
    • For those who file as single, head of household, or married filing separately and did not live with their spouse at any time during the year, that level is $124,000.
    • For filers who are married filing separately and lived with their spouse at any time during the year, any amount of modified AGI reduces their contribution limit.

    The Saver’s Credit, also known as the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit, is often available to IRA contributors whose adjusted gross income falls below certain levels. In addition, beginning in 2018, designated beneficiaries may be eligible for a credit for contributions to their Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) account. For 2018, the income limits are:

    • $32,500; single and married filing separate
    • $48,750; head of household
    • $65,000; married filing jointly

    Taxpayers should use Form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions, to claim the Saver’s Credit, and its instructions for details on figuring the credit correctly.

    Taxpayers can find answers to questions, forms and instructions and easy-to-use tools online at IRS.gov. They can use these resources to get help when it’s needed, at home, at work or on the go.

    This news release is part of a series called the Tax Time Guide, a resource to help taxpayers file an accurate tax return. Additional help is available in Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax For Individuals.

    More resources


  • 11 Mar 2021 1:02 PM | Anonymous

    Today, the IRS published the latest executive column, “A Closer Look,” which features Frank Nolden, Stakeholder Partnership, Education and Communications Director, discussing the benefits and history of  volunteer tax preparation sites. “The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) and Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) programs…help millions of low-to-moderate income taxpayers accurately prepare and file their tax returns for free with help from IRS-certified volunteers,” said Nolden. Read more here. Read the Spanish version here

    A Closer Look” is a column from IRS executives that covers a variety of timely issues of interest to taxpayers and the tax community. It also provides a detailed look at key issues affecting everything from IRS operations and employees to issues involving taxpayers and tax professionals.

    Check here for prior posts and new updates.


  • 09 Mar 2021 11:32 AM | Anonymous

    WASHINGTON – The Internal Revenue Service today urged people to continue practicing proper cybersecurity habits by securing computers, phones and other devices. Scams and schemes using the IRS as a lure can take on many variations, so practicing personal information security is vital.

    This news release is part of a series called the Tax Time Guide, a resource to help taxpayers file an accurate tax return. Additional help is available in Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax.

    The IRS works with the Security Summit, a partnership with state tax agencies and the private-sector tax industry, to help protect taxpayer information and defend against identity theft. Taxpayers and tax professionals can take steps to help in this effort by doing things like minimizing cybersecurity footprints, staying vigilant in protecting personal tax and financial information and being aware of common scams and schemes.

    As a reminder, the IRS doesn’t initiate contact with taxpayers by email, text messages or social media channels to request personal or financial information. Generally, the IRS first mails a paper bill to a person who owes taxes. In some special situations, the IRS will call or come to a home or business.

    People should be alert to scammers posing as the IRS to steal personal information. There are ways to know if it’s really the IRS calling or knocking on someone’s door.

    Below are a few tips to help minimize exposure to fraud and identity theft:

    - Protect personal information. Treat personal information like cash – don’t hand it out to just anyone. Social Security numbers, credit card numbers, bank and even utility account numbers can be used to help steal a person’s money or open new accounts.

    - Safeguard personal data. Provide a Social Security number, for example, only when necessary. Only offer personal information or conduct financial transactions on sites that have been verified as reputable, encrypted websites.

    - Use strong passwords. Use a password phrase or series of words that will be easy for you to remember. Use at least 10 characters; 12 is ideal for most home users. Mix letters, numbers and special characters. Try to be unpredictable – don’t use names, birthdates or common words. Don’t use the same password for many accounts and avoid sharing them. Keep passwords in a secure place or use password management tools.

    Set password and encryption protections for wireless networks. If a home or business Wi-Fi is unsecured, it allows any computer within range to access the wireless network and potentially steal information from connected devices. Whenever it is an option for a password-protected account, users should also opt for a multi-factor authentication process. Multi-factor authentication is critical to protecting your password.

    - Avoid phishing scams. The easiest way for criminals to steal sensitive data is simply to ask for it. IRS urges people to learn to recognize phishing emails, calls or texts that pose as familiar organizations such as banks, credit card companies or even the IRS. Keep sensitive data safe and:

    • Be aware that an unsolicited email with a request to download an attachment or click on a URL could appear to come from someone that you know like a friend, work colleague or tax professional if their email has been spoofed or compromised.
    • Don’t assume internet advertisements, pop-up ads or emails are from reputable companies. If an ad or offer looks too good to be true, take a moment to check out the company behind it.
    • Never download “security” software from a pop-up ad. A pervasive ploy is a pop-up ad that indicates it has detected a virus on the computer. The download most likely will install some type of malware. Reputable security software companies do not advertise in this manner.

    - Use security software. An anti-virus program should provide protection from viruses, Trojans, spyware and adware. The IRS urges people, especially tax professionals, to use an anti-virus program and always keep it up to date.

    Set security software to update automatically so it can be updated as threats emerge. Educate children and those with less online experience about the threats of opening suspicious web pages, emails or documents.

    - Back up files. No system is completely secure. Copy important files, including federal and state tax returns, onto removable discs or back-up drives and cloud storage. Store discs, drives and any paper copies in secure, locked locations.

    - ID Theft Central. Designed to improve online access to information on identity theft, it serves taxpayers, tax professionals and businesses.

    Taxpayers can find answers to questions, forms and instructions and easy-to-use tools online at IRS.gov. They can use these resources to get help when it’s needed at home, at work or on the go.

  • 04 Mar 2021 1:37 PM | Anonymous

    Today, the IRS published the latest executive column, “A Closer Look,” which features Dietra Grant, Customer Account Services Director, discussing the benefits of using Free File options to get tax breaks. “So many people were adversely affected last year in the job market, and their income may be substantially different in 2020 than it was in 2019. Don’t leave money on the table, use Free File online to help,” said Grant. Read more here. Read the Spanish version here.

    A Closer Look” is a column from IRS executives that covers a variety of timely issues of interest to taxpayers and the tax community. It also provides a detailed look at key issues affecting everything from IRS operations and employees to issues involving taxpayers and tax professionals.

    Check here for prior posts and new updates, and refer to the this News Release for more IRS.gov tax time tools.


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