IRS Tax News

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  • 08 Apr 2020 4:27 PM | Anonymous

    The IRS has put up some new links relating to Coronavirus and the following topics:

    • Coronavirus Tax Relief and Economic Impact Payments for Individuals and Families
    • Coronavirus Tax Relief for Businesses and Tax-Exempt Entities
    • Coronavirus Tax Relief for Health Plans and Retirement Plans

    You can access all of these pages via IRS's primary Coronavirus landing page.

  • 08 Apr 2020 12:46 PM | Anonymous

    Revenue Procedure 2020-23 allows an eligible partnership to file an amended Form 1065, U.S. Return of Partnership Income, and furnish a corresponding Schedule K-1 (Form 1065), Partner’s Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc., to each of its partners as an alternative option to filing an administrative adjustment request (AAR).

    Revenue Procedure 2020-23 will be in IRB: IRB 2020-18, dated 04/13/2020.

  • 03 Apr 2020 10:53 AM | Anonymous

    WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service reminded taxpayers, businesses, tax professionals and others to follow the agency’s official social media accounts and email subscription lists to get urgent information on COVID-19 and economic impact payments. These platforms provide the latest alerts and information on various tax topics to include emerging scams.

    These platforms are especially important during the COVID-19 pandemic. Recent changes to filing and payment deadlines, coupled with new business credits and economic impact payments make these free and reliable communications crucial for anyone wanting the latest information.

    “The IRS is committed to sharing information as quickly as possible about the economic impact payments and other tax issues related to the coronavirus,” said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. “IRS social media channels offer taxpayers and others another fast, easy option to get the latest details as the IRS employees continue to work hard to support the nation.”

    Taxpayers can follow key IRS social media platforms

    The IRS uses several social media tools including:

    When using social media to connect with the IRS, verify the accounts by going first to IRS.gov/socialmedia. Taxpayers are urged to watch for IRS impersonators and other scammers, which can try imitating the IRS during crisis situations and natural disasters.

    The IRS reminds taxpayers to never give out personal or financial information to anyone alleging to represent the IRS on a social media platform or in unsolicited emails, texts or calls.

    The IRS also has a free mobile app, IRS2Go, where taxpayers can check their refund status, pay taxes, find free tax help, watch IRS YouTube videos and get daily tax tips. The IRS2Go app is available from the Google Play Store for Android devices, or from the Apple App Store for Apple devices. IRS2Go is available in both English and Spanish.

    Get automatic updates by email

    The IRS e-News Subscription service issues tax information by email for many different audiences. It provides tips, tools and helpful materials of interest to taxpayers and organizations. The IRS offers subscription services tailored to tax exempt and government entities, small and large businesses as well as individuals. The service is easy to use; sign up by visiting IRS e-News Subscriptions.

    The IRS currently has 20 registration-based e-News options, including: 

    • IRS Outreach Connection − This newest IRS subscription offering delivers up-to-date materials for tax professionals and partner groups inside and outside the tax community. The material for Outreach Connection is specifically designed so subscribers can share the material with their clients or members through email, social media, internal newsletters, e-mails or external websites. Subscribe by visiting IRS.gov/outreachconnect.
    • IRS Tax Tips – These brief, concise tips in plain language cover a wide-range of topics of general interest to taxpayers. They include the latest on tax scams, tax reform, tax deductions, filing extensions and amending returns. IRS Tax Tips are distributed daily during tax season and periodically throughout the year.
    • IRS Newswire − Subscribers to IRS Newswire receive news releases the day they are issued. These cover a wide range of tax administration issues ranging from breaking news to details related to legal guidance.
    • IRS News in Spanish (Noticias del IRS en Español) − Readers get IRS news releases, tax tips and updates in Spanish as they are released. Subscribe at Noticias del IRS en Español.
    • e-News for Tax Professionals − Includes a weekly roundup of news releases and legal guidance specifically designed for the tax professional community. Subscribing to e-News for Tax Professionals gets tax pros a weekly summary, typically delivered on Friday afternoons.

    For more information and other IRS subscriptions designed for specific groups, visit IRS e-News Subscriptions. The resources will help taxpayers and organizations keep up with the latest information during and after filing season.

  • 02 Apr 2020 10:16 AM | Anonymous

    WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today urged taxpayers to be on the lookout for a surge of calls and email phishing attempts about the Coronavirus, or COVID-19. These contacts can lead to tax-related fraud and identity theft.

    "We urge people to take extra care during this period. The IRS isn't going to call you asking to verify or provide your financial information so you can get an economic impact payment or your refund faster," said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. "That also applies to surprise emails that appear to be coming from the IRS. Remember, don't open them or click on attachments or links. Go to IRS.gov for the most up-to-date information."

    Taxpayers should watch not only for emails but text messages, websites and social media attempts that request money or personal information.

    “History has shown that criminals take every opportunity to perpetrate a fraud on unsuspecting victims, especially when a group of people is vulnerable or in a state of need,” said IRS Criminal Investigation Chief Don Fort. “While you are waiting to hear about your economic impact payment, criminals are working hard to trick you into getting their hands on it. The IRS Criminal Investigation Division is working hard to find these scammers and shut them down, but in the meantime, we ask people to remain vigilant.”

    Don’t fall prey to Coronavirus tricks; retirees among potential targets
    The IRS and its Criminal Investigation Division have seen a wave of new and evolving phishing schemes against taxpayers. In most cases, the IRS will deposit economic impact payments into the direct deposit account taxpayers previously provided on tax returns. Those taxpayers who have previously filed but not provided direct deposit information to the IRS will be able to provide their banking information online to a newly designed secure portal on IRS.gov in mid-April. If the IRS does not have a taxpayer’s direct deposit information, a check will be mailed to the address on file. Taxpayers should not provide their direct deposit or other banking information for others to input on their behalf into the secure portal.

    The IRS also reminds retirees who don’t normally have a requirement to file a tax return that no action on their part is needed to receive their $1,200 economic impact payment. Seniors should be especially careful during this period. The IRS reminds retirees – including recipients of Forms SSA-1099 and RRB-1099 −  that no one from the agency will be reaching out to them by phone, email, mail or in person asking for any kind of information to complete their economic impact payment, also sometimes referred to as rebates or stimulus payments. The IRS is sending these $1,200 payments automatically to retirees – no additional action or information is needed on their part to receive this.


    The IRS reminds taxpayers that scammers may:

    • Emphasize the words “Stimulus Check” or “Stimulus Payment.” The official term is economic impact payment.
    • Ask the taxpayer to sign over their economic impact payment check to them.
    • Ask by phone, email, text or social media for verification of personal and/or banking information saying that the information is needed to receive or speed up their economic impact payment.
    • Suggest that they can get a tax refund or economic impact payment faster by working on the taxpayer’s behalf. This scam could be conducted by social media or even in person.
    • Mail the taxpayer a bogus check, perhaps in an odd amount, then tell the taxpayer to call a number or verify information online in order to cash it.

    Reporting Coronavirus-related or other phishing attempts
    Those who receive unsolicited emails, text messages or social media attempts to gather information that appear to be from either the IRS or an organization closely linked to the IRS, such as the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS), should forward it to phishing@irs.gov.

    Taxpayers are encouraged not to engage potential scammers online or on the phone. Learn more about reporting suspected scams by going to the Report Phishing and Online Scams page on IRS.gov.

    Official IRS information about the COVID-19 pandemic and economic impact payments can be found on the Coronavirus Tax Relief page on IRS.gov. The page is updated quickly when new information is available.

  • 01 Apr 2020 3:29 PM | Anonymous

    Announcement 2020-04 provides that all hearings on notices of proposed rulemaking will be held telephonically and encourages submission of public comments via regulations.gov.

    Announcement 2020-04 will appear in IRB 2020-17 dated April 4, 2020.

  • 01 Apr 2020 8:05 AM | Anonymous

    WASHINGTON — The Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service today launched the Employee Retention Credit, designed to encourage businesses to keep employees on their payroll. The refundable tax credit is 50% of up to $10,000 in wages paid by an eligible employer whose business has been financially impacted by COVID-19.

    Does my business qualify to receive the Employee Retention Credit?

    The credit is available to all employers regardless of size, including tax-exempt organizations. There are only two exceptions: State and local governments and their instrumentalities and small businesses who take small business loans.

    Qualifying employers must fall into one of two categories:

    1. The employer’s business is fully or partially suspended by government order due to COVID-19 during the calendar quarter.
    2. The employer’s gross receipts are below 50% of the comparable quarter in 2019. Once the employer’s gross receipts go above 80% of a comparable quarter in 2019, they no longer qualify after the end of that quarter.

    These measures are calculated each calendar quarter.

    How is the credit calculated?

    The amount of the credit is 50% of qualifying wages paid up to $10,000 in total. Wages paid after March 12, 2020, and before Jan. 1, 2021, are eligible for the credit. Wages taken into account are not limited to cash payments, but also include a portion of the cost of employer provided health care.

    How do I know which wages qualify?

    Qualifying wages are based on the average number of a business’s employees in 2019.

    Employers with less than 100 employees: If the employer had 100 or fewer employees on average in 2019, the credit is based on wages paid to all employees, regardless if they worked or not. If the employees worked full time and were paid for full time work, the employer still receives the credit.

    Employers with more than 100 employees:  If the employer had more than 100 employees on average in 2019, then the credit is allowed only for wages paid to employees who did not work during the calendar quarter.

    I am an eligible employer. How do I receive my credit?

    Employers can be immediately reimbursed for the credit by reducing their required deposits of payroll taxes that have been withheld from employees’ wages by the amount of the credit.

    Eligible employers will report their total qualified wages and the related health insurance costs for each quarter on their quarterly employment tax returns or Form 941 beginning with the second quarter. If the employer’s employment tax deposits are not sufficient to cover the credit, the employer may receive an advance payment from the IRS by submitting Form 7200, Advance Payment of Employer Credits Due to COVID-19.

    Eligible employers can also request an advance of the Employee Retention Credit by submitting Form 7200.

    Where can I find more information on the Employer Retention Credit and other COVID-19 economic relief efforts?

    Updates on the implementation of this credit,  Frequently Asked Questions on Tax Credits for Required Paid Leave and other information can be found on the Coronavirus page of IRS.gov.

  • 01 Apr 2020 8:04 AM | Anonymous

    Notice 2020-22 provides a waiver of additions to tax for failure to make a deposit of taxes for employers required to pay qualified sick leave wages and qualified family leave wages mandated by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (Families First Act) and qualified health plan expenses allocable to these wages.  This notice also provides a waiver of additions to tax for failure to make a deposit of taxes for certain employers subject to a full or partial closure order due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) or experiencing a statutorily specified decline in business under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act).  This notice applies to deposits of Employment Taxes (including withheld income taxes, taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act and taxes under the Railroad Retirement Act) reduced in anticipation of the credits with respect to qualified sick leave wages and qualified family leave wages paid with respect to the period beginning April 1, 2020, and ending December 31, 2020.  This notice applies with respect to deposits of Employment Taxes reduced in anticipation of the credits with respect to qualified wages paid with respect to the period beginning on March 13, 2020, and ending December 31, 2020.  This relief ensures that such employers may pay qualified sick leave wages and qualified family leave wages required by the Families First Act or qualified wages under the CARES Act using Employment Taxes that would otherwise be required to be deposited without incurring a failure to deposit penalty.

    Notice 2020-22 will be in IRB: 2020-17, dated 03/31/2020.

  • 31 Mar 2020 8:11 AM | Anonymous

    Check IRS.gov for the latest information: No action needed by most people at this time

    WASHINGTON – The Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service today announced that distribution of economic impact payments will begin in the next three weeks and will be distributed automatically, with no action required for most people. However, some seniors and others who typically do not file returns will need to submit a simple tax return to receive the stimulus payment.

    Who is eligible for the economic impact payment?
    Tax filers with adjusted gross income up to $75,000 for individuals and up to $150,000 for married couples filing joint returns will receive the full payment. For filers with income above those amounts, the payment amount is reduced by $5 for each $100 above the $75,000/$150,000 thresholds. Single filers with income exceeding $99,000 and $198,000 for joint filers with no children are not eligible.

    Eligible taxpayers who filed tax returns for either 2019 or 2018 will automatically receive an economic impact payment of up to $1,200 for individuals or $2,400 for married couples. Parents also receive $500 for each qualifying child.

    How will the IRS know where to send my payment?
    The vast majority of people do not need to take any action. The IRS will calculate and automatically send the economic impact payment to those eligible.

    For people who have already filed their 2019 tax returns, the IRS will use this information to calculate the payment amount. For those who have not yet filed their return for 2019, the IRS will use information from their 2018 tax filing to calculate the payment. The economic impact payment will be deposited directly into the same banking account reflected on the return filed.

    The IRS does not have my direct deposit information. What can I do?
    In the coming weeks, Treasury plans to develop a web-based portal for individuals to provide their banking information to the IRS online, so that individuals can receive payments immediately as opposed to checks in the mail.

    I am not typically required to file a tax return. Can I still receive my payment?
    Yes. People who typically do not file a tax return will need to file a simple tax return to receive an economic impact payment. Low-income taxpayers, senior citizens, Social Security recipients, some veterans and individuals with disabilities who are otherwise not required to file a tax return will not owe tax.

    How can I file the tax return needed to receive my economic impact payment?
    IRS.gov/coronavirus will soon provide information instructing people in these groups on how to file a 2019 tax return with simple, but necessary, information including their filing status, number of dependents and direct deposit bank account information.

    I have not filed my tax return for 2018 or 2019. Can I still receive an economic impact payment?
    Yes. The IRS urges anyone with a tax filing obligation who has not yet filed a tax return for 2018 or 2019 to file as soon as they can to receive an economic impact payment. Taxpayers should include direct deposit banking information on the return.

    I need to file a tax return. How long are the economic impact payments available?
    For those concerned about visiting a tax professional or local community organization in person to get help with a tax return, these economic impact payments will be available throughout the rest of 2020.

    Where can I get more information?
    The IRS will post all key information on IRS.gov/coronavirus as soon as it becomes available.

    The IRS has a reduced staff in many of its offices but remains committed to helping eligible individuals receive their payments expeditiously. Check for updated information on IRS.gov/coronavirus rather than calling IRS assistors who are helping process 2019 returns.

  • 30 Mar 2020 8:10 AM | Anonymous

    Notice 2020-20; Federal income tax filing and payment relief on account of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) emergency. This notice provides relief in addition to the relief provided in Notice 2020-18, issued on March 20, 2020. In this notice, the Treasury Department and IRS are providing relief to all taxpayers who have Federal gift (and generation-skipping transfer) tax returns and payments due on April 15, 2020. The April 15, 2020 deadline is postponed to July 15, 2020. Associated interest, additions to tax, and penalties for late filing or late payment will be suspended until July 15, 2020.

    Notice 2020-20 will be in IRB 2020-16, dated April 13, 2020.

  • 27 Mar 2020 4:09 PM | Anonymous

    Notice 2020-21 provides that employment tax credits for paid qualified sick leave wages and paid qualified family leave wages required by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“the Act”) will apply to such wages and compensation paid for periods beginning on April 1, 2020 and ending on December 31, 2020, and that days beginning on April 1, 2020 and ending on December 31, 2020 will be taken into account for credits for paid qualified sick leave equivalents and paid qualified family leave equivalents for certain self-employed individuals provided by the Act.

    Notice 2020-21 will be in IRB:  2020-16, dated April 13, 2020.

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